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Jamie

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Jamie

Postby Tim Anderson » Fri Dec 29, 2017 2:16 pm

Hey bud hope you not skinning those coon, not much of a market for them again this year..


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Tim Anderson
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Re: Jamie

Postby Tim Anderson » Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:56 pm

I also read your article, not bad for someone only been calling since 2007. :D

Howling to locate is something not to be taken for granted, fewer empty stands and a good Idea of what's there. Was locating one early mourning in the Dakota's and could hear them lite up the whole valley, chain reaction if you will, pretty cool.. I've never used a siren to locate, just the E-caller with actual live howls or a hand howler.. You mentioned that the alpha pair is readily to answer to any howls or siren and the younger not so eager. I agree with this some what but also found those tight lipped coyotes may require a howl not so aggressive and find a more of a higher pitch howler to do the trick. Western coyotes are not like Southern Mn. coyotes, oh sure they have some of the same habits or similarities but still behave differently. I guess you could call them pressured coyotes due to all the traffic going on in there areas with one mile sections and farmers in the fields in the spring and fall then the hunters take over for the rest of the winter. The good news is after many nights/years of locating here at home I got a better understanding of them and how they go about there daily routines and such from early spring through the summer and the rest of the year. Also thanks to my dogs and running them I also have a understanding of the key spots (core areas) and favorite places they like to hole up for a day and this is passed on from one coyote to the next with a few exceptions.. There was one thing the western coyotes and southern Mn. coyotes had in common when pressured was they would pretty much bed up for the day in same areas. Take a pasture in S.D for example that see's lots of calling pressure. A hunter shows up at the gate and notices all kinds of coyote sign all over the two track and think boy this is going to be good. They drive in a 1/2 mile or so and make a stand, nothing so they move to the next and still nothing. This may go on all mourning till the hunter figures out its time to move on and then also comes up with an excuse they must not be hungry.. LOL I've been to some of these areas and talked with hunters so I knew but I still went in and called. I used some of the basic sounds and nothing fancy and had them all over me in 15-30 minutes.. What did I do different?? I went to there new core area if you will which was located at the far end of the pasture or in a corner far away from the two track. Another hot spot was in the same pasture and only past the gate about 1/4 mile and then I worked left and right or parallel with the fence, I could see the road in most spots I called from...
How far does a coyote run that's been shot at or spooked? Depends on how bad I guess, some go as little as a
1/2 mile if there are enough hills or cover and some go a mile or better but have seen check up at 2 miles roughly. They don't leave the county.. LOL

Studies are good but I find that most people cannot grasp what they read, if they could we wouldn't have all these future callers on forums asking what am I doing wrong. Through the years I picked up some on how coyotes think/work while I hunt/stalked them, then kicked it up another notch by hunting them with a group of hunters and also by trapping them and just driving through there areas after a fresh snow, then moved onto calling them and the icing on the cake was running them with dogs.. The coyotes have most any book beat as far as info goes, coyotes are the best teacher. The thing with the dogs is all of them are fitted with a Garmin tracking collar, you just sit back and watch them work a area and you will get a dam good idea of how the coyotes move around and where there key spots are that they like to bed in for the day. Another example: A 80 acre CRP field with a creek running through it and some cat-tail or willow patches that has been hit all fall by deer and pheasant hunters for over two month's. Whew! Talk about pressure....
I ran my young dogs in this 80 acre crp field and the dogs jumped 3 coyotes that wanted to play the cat and mouse game they learned from previous experience when the pheasant hunters went in with there bird dogs. The coyotes just moved out and away from the dogs and then circled back behind them and then bedded back down, the bird dogs paid them no mind as they was bird dogs trained to hunt birds. Ok back to the dogs.. Well the dogs played the cat and mouse game most of the mourning till the dogs lost them due to too many tracks and having area all scented up..
I went back to same location 2-3 days later and casted dogs from same spot and first coyote once again is jumped 100-200 yards from my truck and moves north through the grass till its joined up with a second coyote to try and help get the dogs off. In away it worked as once again the second coyote pulled two of the dogs off from first coyote, so now my dogs are split up and running two separate coyotes. The coyotes are now running two different directions circling and weaving through the grass trying to loose the dogs and one of the coyotes hits the northern edge of the grass and a third coyote jumps in to help as the dogs had that coyote down on the ground for a short time and you could hear some pretty good coyote vocals and squeal's. Two dogs stayed with this coyote and a 3rd dog dropped off and went after the third coyote, so now I had three races going on... Well it pretty much ended the same way as the first day, too much scent in the grass and the dogs could not jump them again. Coyotes are smart they will jump off to the side of a track or trail and just lay there hoping the dogs pass by..

I let the coyotes rest up for a few days and then back at them and the same thing happens as first two hunts, coyote bedded 200 yds. from starting point and one in middle and the other at the other end of the grass and running in to help one another. At the time I did not know it but the dogs had one banged up from the second hunt and just could not loose the dogs and it finally left the long grass. Great! The dogs all harked in and made the run for roughly 1 1/4 miles and then bayed it up.. Game over..
So you see the coyotes know how to adapt to pressure, they don't leave there terr. just change where the bed up for the day, its there terr. and may have no where to go or if it has plenty of what they need to survive...


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Tim Anderson
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Re: Jamie

Postby Coyotehunter » Mon Jul 23, 2018 5:26 pm

Tim Anderson wrote:I also read your article, not bad for someone only been calling since 2007. :D


confused me with this statement


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Re: Jamie

Postby Tim Anderson » Sun Jul 29, 2018 2:41 pm

Been awhile since I posted this and also read your article. Didn't you mention in article you started calling in 2007? anyway I forgot were I got the date from..


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Re: Jamie

Postby Coyotehunter » Mon Jul 30, 2018 2:20 pm

I started with the govt. in 2007. Started calling back in the mid 80"s


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