• Advertisement

Good Coyote Hunting Books

We want to hear your opinion or questions on the videos, guns, calls, etc.

Moderators: Prairie Ghost, Coyotehunter

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby Red Fox » Fri Jan 16, 2009 5:58 pm

Look up Minnesota Trapline Products. If its not on their website call. They should be able to help you find it.


User avatar
Red Fox
coyotehunter
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2007 2:50 pm
Location: West Central Mn

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby Dcoy » Fri Jan 16, 2009 6:36 pm

Thanks Red Fox.Its not on their site but I sent them an e-mail.
Had no idea of their existence.Pennock,Mn amazes me-a high % of the people around that little town are relatives of mine. :D


User avatar
Dcoy
Top Dog
 
Posts: 1156
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 7:33 am
Location: SD

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby Prairie Ghost » Mon Jan 19, 2009 11:53 am

I think one of the only places to buy that one is O'Gorman enterprises themselves great book and is truly one the coyote hunters bibles out there.
Money is a great servant but a terrible master!!


User avatar
Prairie Ghost
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2270
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 7:38 pm
Location: On the line

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby Fargus » Fri Feb 13, 2009 4:22 am

If you are having trouble with finding older books especially on sites like ebay and amazon there is an internet site dedicated to used books. Its called abebooks.com and links up used book sellers across north america. I have had good like finding old, out of print and rarer (even first edition if you were a collector) stuff on there. Might be worth a try.


User avatar
Fargus
coyotehunter
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 4:47 pm
Location: Mid-western Ontario, Canada

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby lyonch » Fri Feb 13, 2009 5:19 am

Thanks for the update and link fargus!!!!
Chris Lyon


My mind belongs to my work,
My heart belongs to my family,
BUT MY SOUL BELONGS TO THE COYOTES!!!


User avatar
lyonch
coyotehunter
 
Posts: 2795
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 7:52 pm
Location: Not where i want to be

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby Dcoy » Wed Mar 18, 2009 4:50 pm

I've been reading every book I can find about coyotes this winter and most of them have been mentioned here.Just started re-reading an old favorite and thought I'd mention it here.The title is :"Dakota Cowboy.My Life In The Old Days" by Ike Blasingame.Ike was a real cowboy back in the day.Ike tells the true story of the early 1900s when the US Dept Of Interior leased out vast areas in the Dakotas to the huge cattle companies then existing.These were primarily reservation lands(Standing Rock,Cheyenne,etc)leased 'for the benefit of the indian owners'.If you're into the Dakotas,Cowboys,horses,cattle,indians and history this is great stuff!Factual stuff.Fascinating real world stuff by a guy who was there.I'd say must reading if you live in or near or hunt the Dakotas.You'll recognize the areas,rivers,etc and appreciate how tough this country and life in it was back then.
I bring it up here just cause it has neat parts about the wolves there then and their relationship to coyotes.I won't ruin it by saying more but its great! :D


User avatar
Dcoy
Top Dog
 
Posts: 1156
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 7:33 am
Location: SD

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby Coyotehunter » Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:16 pm

The Puma: Mysterious American Cat By Stanley P. Young
I just got this in Hard cover written in 1946 It is the 4th in a serious on the big predator on North America written by one the greats in the world of predator control. This is some of what I found on him doing a quick search using Google.


Stanley Paul Young (1899-1969) was born in Astoria, Oregon, on October 30, 1899. The son of a pioneer Columbia River salmon packer, Young grew up in that region and spent a good part of his boyhood in outdoor pursuits. His interests led him to the University of Oregon where he received his B.A. in mining engineering in 1911. He went to the University of Michigan for graduate work in geology, but his interests changed and he completed his M.S. in biology.

In 1917, on his way to California to teach, Young stopped to see his brother in Arizona. While there, he was offered a position as a ranger for the U.S. Forest Service, which he accepted. A few months later he joined the Bureau of Biological Survey of the Department of Agriculture as a hunter. He worked in that area to control predatory animals that were destroying the livestock of local ranchers. While on the job, he crossed the Mexican border, was captured by Pancho Villa, and remained in his camp for a week before being rescued.

In 1919, Young became assistant inspector for Arizona and New Mexico and, in 1921, agent-in-control of predatory animal work in the Colorado-Kansas district. He remained there until 1927 when he was assigned to Washington, D.C., as assistant head of the Division of Predatory Animal and Rodent Control. In Washington, Young filled a variety of positions in the Biological Survey: chief of the Division of Economic Operations, 1928-1934; chief of the Division of Game Management, 1934-1938, and chief of the Division of Predator and Rodent Control, 1938-1939. When the Biological Survey was transferred to the Department of Interior in 1939, Young was made senior biologist in the Branch of Wildlife Research, where he worked with Hartley H. T. Jackson. In 1957, when the Bird and Mammal Laboratories were made an independent research unit, Young was named the first director and remained there until his retirement in 1959.

Young's chief interests were the predatory mammals of the West: the wolf, coyote, puma, and bobcat. His major publications included The Wolves of North America, with Edward Alphonso Goldman (1944), The Puma, Mysterious American Cat, with E. A. Goldman (1946), The Wolf in North American History (1946), The Clever Coyote, with Hartley H. T. Jackson (1951), and The Bobcat of North America (1958).


The only modern day guy I know of that has a resume that is even near as colorful and/or impressive would be in my opion Sherm Blom. Anything you can find with his name on it your need to read. expecialy if you want to learn about Lures.
Coyotes Forever


User avatar
Coyotehunter
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3355
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 10:57 am
Location: Wyoming

Re: Good Coyote Hunting Books

Postby Coyotehunter » Sat Apr 15, 2017 12:06 pm

Been reading "Coyote America" by Dan Flores
some really out there claims in his american history on coyote territorial expansion. The book starts out with a very long and dry conversation on how the coyote came to be called the "Coyote". Lots of talk on spirituality and the Indians relationship with the song dog. Very little information that i found that was supported by any studies. Doesn't really clearly reference any of his claims to any particular studies or research papers done on the topic. Outlandish claims like coyote regulate their size of litters based on vocalization responses.... really comes across as a supporter of not hunting coyote. You may want to wait till this one hits the library for a free read I wouldn't recommend spending the money on this book. I would at the very least read "the voice of the coyote" by Frank Dolby if you truly would like to read a book with information about coyote history with the American Indian population and also gained some useful knowledge about the life of a coyote. Unfortunately mr. Flores comes across as a fanboy of Dolby and basically tries to replicate most of what Dolby had to say on the subject.


User avatar
Coyotehunter
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3355
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 10:57 am
Location: Wyoming

Previous

Return to Product Review - Coyote Hunting Tips

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron